EDUART

Dir. and screenplay by Angeliki Antoniou

A young Albanian, brought up in an oppressive family environment, comes to Athens to pursue a better life. When prospects for illegal immigrants prove dim, he gets involved in the hustling scene and instinctively commits a murder. Returning to Albania, he is imprisoned under harsh conditions for an unrelated crime. There, under the guidance of a German doctor, he begins his struggle toward personal redemption. While the theme of transcendence gives the drama a Dostoevski-like gloss, the film addresses complicated issues of character and social attitudes.

This much-praised film won nine awards at the Thessaloniki International Film Festival and was the Greek entry for “Best Foreign Film” Academy Award consideration last year.

EYES OF NIGHT (MATIA APO NYXTA)

Dir. and screenplay by Pericles Hoursoglou

Three fallible people navigate one of life’s most difficult passages in this gripping drama about searching for love and connection. Hronis, a middle-aged trucker, has no idea of how to relate to either of the two women in his life. A decent but selfish man who has narrowed life down to his own needs and pleasures, he behaves badly and hurts the woman he probably really loves.

The luminous Vangelio Andreadaki was named Best Actress at the 44th Thessaloniki International Film Festival for her heartbreaking performance in this emotionally shattering film.

THE HOMECOMING (I EPISTROFI)

Dir. and screenplay by Vassilis Douvlis

In this spare, well-crafted film, the difficulties of repatriation are played against a story of marital infidelity and personal betrayal. After years of factory work in Germany, Elias and his much younger wife return to their almost deserted village near Ioannina. Indifferent to his wife’s unhappiness, he buys a service station/café and hires a young illegal Albanian immigrant to help run the business. The situation becomes complicated when the young man finds himself drawn to his boss’s wife. The surprise ending is a stunner.

LITTLE GREEK GODFATHER (PROTI FORA NONOS)

Dir. Olga Malea,
Screenplay by Olga Malea and Nicholas Papandreou

A prominent Greek politician sends his American-raised eleven year old son to Crete to win votes by baptizing the baby of a local party boss and parliamentary candidate. The young boy’s initiation into the world of politics leads him to start wondering about his own needs and not just about his father’s expectations. This gentle comedy is an ideal family film. Adults will relish the political satire while youngsters will enjoy watching the young hero come into his own.

SIRENS IN THE AEGEAN
(LOUFA KAI PARALAYI: SIRINES STO AEGAEO)

Dir. and screenplay by Nikos Perakis

Military drills on an uninhabited island near Kos are disrupted when a Turkish yacht unexpectedly comes ashore with a curious collection of passengers, ranging from political refuges to Turkish beauty queens. Chaos ensues, but hostilities are averted once stereotypes, biases and prejudices are discarded.

An example of commercial movie making of the highest order, this crowd-pleasing film currently holds the record for most tickets sold in its first-run engagement in Greece.

URANYA

Dir. and screenplay by Costas Kapakas

Five teenagers in a small village are bound by a common goal: to save enough money to pay for a visit to the beautiful Uranya. An enchantress who lives just outside the village next to the sea, she can teach the boys the mysteries of love. But this is the summer of 1969,
and loyalties will be tested as the boys face a dilemma: do they use the money to buy a television set to watch the moon landing or do they remain true to their original goal.

TWO ASTONISHING DOCUMENTARIES THAT EXPLORE THE HUMAN SPIRIT

THE LOVERS FROM AXOS (OI ERASTES TIS AXOU)

Dir. Nicos Ligouris

This moving documentary tells the story of a couple whose love for one another has endured for nearly three generations. Living in a mountain village in Crete, the two share their daily activities: dying thread for the loom, drying raisins, tending their shop—all the while
facing the unbearable knowledge that failing health threatens to sever their loving union.

RESURFACE (ANADYSI)

Dir. Alexander Papanicolaou and Emilie Yannoukou

An up close and personal documentary about Alexandros Taxildaris, a 25 year old quadriplegic determined to overcome his limitations and compete as a swimmer in the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games. Injured in a freak swimming accident, he returns once again to the water to “resurface.”

MODERN CLASSICS

NEVER ON SUNDAY (POTE TI KIRIAKI)

Dir. and screenplay by Jules Dassin

As a tribute to veteran director Jules Dassin who died in Athens earlier this year, the New York City Greek Film Festival presents his undiminished landmark 1960 film in its first theatrical showing in many years. Come experience the joy as American philhellene Homer Thrace (played by Dassin himself) tries to transform a living woman, an enchanting Melina Mercouri, into a symbol of the glory of ancient Greece.

Melina won the best actress award at Cannes for her performance. Manos Hadjidakis won an Oscar for his glorious music.

THE PRIVATE RIGHT

Dir. and screenplay by Michael Papas

An EOKA guerilla fighter comes to London to exact vengeance on the collaborator who betrayed and tortured him. Shot guerrilla-style on the streets of London in 1965, this film was probably the first truly independent feature made outside the system in UK. Despite the political storm raised by the film due mainly to scenes of a British officer engaged in water-boarding torture in Cyprus, the film was acclaimed by critics and was selected as best British film of the year to represent UK at the London Film Festival.

SPECIAL EVENTS

THE CALLER

Dir. Richard Ledes
Screenplay by Richard Ledes and Alain Didier-Weill

Frank Langella and Elliott Gould star in this noir-thriller about an executive at an international energy firm who effectively signs his own death warrant when he decides to blow the whistle on his company’s corrupt practices in Latin America. The Festival is proud to present this compelling film before its national release.

Mr. Ledes will answer questions following the screening.

SONG OF LIFE (TO TRAGOUDI TIS ZOIS)

Dir. Tony Likouressis

An EOKA guerilla fighter comes to London to exact vengeance on the collaborator who betrayed and tortured him. Shot guerrilla-style on the streets of London in 1965, this film was probably the first truly independent feature made outside the system in UK. Despite the political storm raised by the film due mainly to scenes of a British officer engaged in water-boarding torture in Cyprus, the film was acclaimed by critics and was selected as best British film of the year to represent UK at the London Film Festival.

SHORT SUBJECTS

BACH AND BOUZOUKI

Dir. and screenplay by Angela Milonaki

The young daughter of Greek immigrants living in Germany must reconcile her determination to study classical music with the expectations and demands of her traditional Greek family.

HIDDEN IN THE SAND

Dir. Vasia Markides

This short documentary chronicles the story of Famagusta (Varosha), a city in the Turkish-occupied part of Cyprus that was evacuated by its Greek Cypriot population during the 1974 invasion. Since then, a large portion of the city has been encircled by barbed wire, kept under surveillance by the Turkish military, and used as a bargaining chip in negotiations with the Cyprus government. Contemporary scenes of the vacant city are contrasted with archives of the bourgeoning city of the 1970s. The film tackles the ugly effects of nationalism, militarism and propaganda, highlighting the absurdity of ethnic conflict and culminating in a general sentiment of hopefulness and an eagerness for change.